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Natural soy candles + melts. Hand-poured in small batches in Delaware.

Shine the Light Campaign: 10% donated to domestic violence awareness.


{A Southern Thing} Telling My Story: Narratives of My Look Book

{A Southern Thing} Telling My Story: Narratives of My Look Book

A Southern Thing

I sometimes get teased for growing up in Delaware, and considering myself southern. And that’s fine. Because honestly, you don’t have to live in or have grown up in the American south to be southern. Being southern is a way of being, it’s a way of life, and it’s a beautiful endless combination of sensibilities that comfort your soul and warm (and bless!) your heart.

Because I like to point it out, however, my family is from South Carolina (so stick that in your pipe and smoke it!)—although yes, I grew up in the suburbs of northern Delaware which is technically above (just slightly to the right of, one could even say parallel to) the Mason-Dixon line. No matter. Because it’s true: being southern is a way of life. My parents, being from South Carolina (have I mentioned that?), made it a point to raise my brothers and I with proper southern etiquette.

‘Yes ma’am, yes sir; please and thank you’—especially before, during, and after meals—were all part of our vocabulary. Those metal boxes on wheels at the grocery store were not called “shopping carts” they were called “buggies.” Not going for seconds at the supper table was considered rude. Homemade tea never, ever, had less than 2 cups of sugar per pitcher. Mayonnaise was not a condiment, it was a stand-alone food—and a must if you were making any sandwich, hot dog, hamburger, or anything that involved placing meat or a vegetable between two slices of bread. The phrase “bless your heart” had many meanings, defined in the moment depending on the recipient. Mosquito bites weren’t treated with special ointment—it was straight up rubbing alcohol, or in my case as a little girl: a broke-open cigarette’s tobacco mixed with spit to form a paste to “draw out the poison.” Gardens weren’t a hobby, it was just what was done—grown and looked after with love and attention like our lives depended on it. If you were going through hell, you kept going with a smile on your face and Jesus in your heart and you never, ever, gave up. If something was broken, you fixed it. Rain was something to be thankful for—and front porches were made to sit and watch and listen to thunderstorms (with a glass of that homemade sweet tea). Sundays were saved for the Lord, rest, and extended-family suppers.

Importance of Narrative

Warmth of a Memory + Strength of a Story

Beyond running a successful business and a foundation, I’m looking to connect with people. Ever since I was a little girl I loved storytelling. As an adult, I can appreciate the strength of narrative and how it can both encourage and inspire. Narrative can bring people together, transport you to familiar and faraway places, and often: narrative can heal.

Your sense of smell is the strongest attached to memory. A certain aroma can do wonders to connect us with and resurface old memories. And while it’s important to live in the present, there’s something truly meaningful in remembering moments from our own history. Sharing these stories with each other is such a powerful and joyful experience in humility, kindness, and understanding. For survivors of trauma, like myself, sharing your story is critical to the success of the healing process.

Each of my scents are inspired by people, places, and experiences from my life. The unique names reflect moments of my story, revealed and experienced with each burn. So far, I’ve shared parts about my childhood; my time as a freshly single woman trying to rebuild herself whilst living in a studio apartment in Washington, DC; my partner and his unconditional love and unwavering support; my time in France when I fell in love with the discovery of the new and first realized the importance of listening to and trusting myself; and a bit about my experience of being raised in a southern family with southern values. I also feature scents that represent ideas and beliefs that are meaningful to me.

{La France} Telling My Story: Narratives of My Look Book

{La France} Telling My Story: Narratives of My Look Book

 {Cooking} Telling My Story: Narratives of my Look Book

{Cooking} Telling My Story: Narratives of my Look Book

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